In the Classroom : the Learning Experience

From Rider's early days women were admitted as students, sharing the classroom their male counterparts. Rider's predecessor, the Trenton Business College, being part of the original Bryant & Stratton chain of business schools, followed the rules of that chain which began admitting women in 1853. Women were however, a distinct minority in the classroom.

Marian Ashton is the first woman graduate of the Trenton Business College, graduating in either 1866 or 1867. In 1902, the first African-American female graduate graduated from Rider-Moore & Stewart Business College, another precursor to Rider.

The early decades of the 20th century saw the enrollment of many more women students. Bookkeeping, accounting, shorthand, arithmetic and other business related subjects were the backbone of the cirruculum. The School of Education was established in 1913, furthering Rider's course offerings in the field of teaching, which attracted large numbers of women students.

 

Stewart Business School women shorthand department students, 1897.

Stewart Business School women shorthand department students with instructor, 1897.

Stewart School Commercial and Examination classroom, 1900.

Stewart School Commercial and Examination classroom, 1900.

Stewart School typewriting department, 1900.

Stewart School Commercial and Examination classroom, 1900.

School of Business typing class, 1942.

School of Business typing class, 1942.

Students standing in a classroom full of computer equipment, 1996.

Students standing in a classroom full of computer equipment, 1996.

In the Classroom : the Learning Experience